The Role of the Innate Immune System in the Development of Rheumatic Diseases

The Role of the Innate Immune System in the Development of Rheumatic Diseases

The Role of the Innate Immune System in the Development of Rheumatic Diseases
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About this Research Topic
The innate immune system, which represents the body's first line of defense against pathogens, has been implicated in the development of multiple Rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, SLE, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This evolutionarily conserved system is comprised of multiple components which may play a role in early and established disease. Specifically, the innate immune system comprises phagocytes, acute phases reactants, antimicrobial peptides, pattern recognition receptors, and cytokines. Moreover, it has been established recently that the innate system can develop immunological memory against previous insults in the form of trained immunity. Collectively these components can contribute to a break in immunological tolerance, the initiation of disease, and the long-term perpetuation of inflammation.
Previous research on the role of innate immune cells in the development of Rheumatic diseases has been hindered by the rarity of these cells as well as the difficulty in isolating and culturing such cells in vitro. However in the past decade with the emergence of more high throughput technologies such as advanced multicolor flow cytometry, and single-cell RNA sequencing, advances in this field are emerging. Given that the innate immune system is the body's first line of natural defense, dysregulation in this system likely contributes to the initiation of autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. In order to understand the development and progression of these diseases, it is incumbent we explore and understand the contribution of the innate system and its components on disease initiation and propagation.
In this Research Topic we aim to collect manuscripts on the following subjects:
• Translational studies and mechanistic studies exploring the role of macrophages, dendritic cells, monocytes and NK cells in human rheumatic disease.
• Studies examining the role of trained immunity in the development of rheumatic diseases
• Novel mechanisms of therapy which involve manipulation of innate immune system components
• Studies providing novel mechanistic insight into the role of PRR, cytokines, acute phase reactants on the initiation and development of rheumatic diseases.
Keywords: Innate Immunity, Antigen Presenting Cells, Rheumatoid Arhritis, Dendritic Cells, Monocytes, Macrophages, Pattern Recognition, Trained Immunity
Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.
The innate immune system, which represents the body's first line of defense against pathogens, has been implicated in the development of multiple Rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, SLE, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This evolutionarily conserved system is comprised of multiple components which may play a role in early and established disease. Specifically, the innate immune system comprises phagocytes, acute phases reactants, antimicrobial peptides, pattern recognition receptors, and cytokines. Moreover, it has been established recently that the innate system can develop immunological memory against previous insults in the form of trained immunity. Collectively these components can contribute to a break in immunological tolerance, the initiation of disease, and the long-term perpetuation of inflammation.
Previous research on the role of innate immune cells in the development of Rheumatic diseases has been hindered by the rarity of these cells as well as the difficulty in isolating and culturing such cells in vitro. However in the past decade with the emergence of more high throughput technologies such as advanced multicolor flow cytometry, and single-cell RNA sequencing, advances in this field are emerging. Given that the innate immune system is the body's first line of natural defense, dysregulation in this system likely contributes to the initiation of autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. In order to understand the development and progression of these diseases, it is incumbent we explore and understand the contribution of the innate system and its components on disease initiation and propagation.
In this Research Topic we aim to collect manuscripts on the following subjects:
• Translational studies and mechanistic studies exploring the role of macrophages, dendritic cells, monocytes and NK cells in human rheumatic disease.
• Studies examining the role of trained immunity in the development of rheumatic diseases
• Novel mechanisms of therapy which involve manipulation of innate immune system components
• Studies providing novel mechanistic insight into the role of PRR, cytokines, acute phase reactants on the initiation and development of rheumatic diseases.
Keywords: Innate Immunity, Antigen Presenting Cells, Rheumatoid Arhritis, Dendritic Cells, Monocytes, Macrophages, Pattern Recognition, Trained Immunity
Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.
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